Category: jazz fusion

Kanaan

“Oslo based trio Kanaan quickly established themselves as one of the most important groups in the youngest generation of psychedelic impro-rockers. As accomplished players – all three educated in jazz – they marry fiery energy with musical intricacy, and possess a rare ability to balance power and delicateness. They devote as much energy to exploring airiness and atmosphere as they do to intensity…”

Windborne (2018)

Odense Sessions (2020)

Secret Oyster

“SECRET OYSTER became somewhat of a super group when members of BURNIN’RED IVANHOE, CORONARIAS DANS and HURDY GURDY formed this unit. By the end of BURNIN’ RED IVANHOE’s career (that spawned seven years), Karsten Vogel started forming a new band… Their sound recalled MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA, NUCLEUS, Herbie Hancock’s Mwandishi and Sextant albums as well as Miles DAVIS’s Bitches Brew…”

Secret Oyster (1973)

Sea Son (1974)

John McLaughlin – Devotion (1970)

Devotion (1970)

“This recording date grew out of sessions Alan Douglas put together, featuring McLaughlin and Larry Young jamming with Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Miles (Billy Rich was the bass player). McLaughlin sounded timid next to Hendrix (none of the material with Hendrix has been officially released), but really comes to life on Devotion. This is arguably one of the finest acid rock albums of all time. McLaughlin is on fire, using fuzzboxes and phasers, over Larry Young’s swirling Hammond B-3, with Billy Rich and Buddy Miles as the rock-solid rhythm section. If you think that McLaughlin’s solo at the end of “Right Off” (from A Tribute to Jack Johnson) is one of the high points of his career, then this is the album for you…”

Dennis – Hyperthalamus (1975)

Hyperthalamus (1975)

“Carsten Bohn was a pilllar of the first wave of German Rock bands. He drummed for the ‘City Preachers’ (1969) , then for ‘Frumpy’ (1970-1972) before creating in 1973, the band ‘Dennis’, named after his son, with ‘Frumpy’ bandmate Thomas Kretschmer. The band’s headquarters was an old village school outside of Hamburg, where the band lived and rehearsed with often-changing line-ups including Manfred Rürup (‘Tommorrow’s Gift’) and Michael Kops on keyboards, Thomas Kretschmer (Ex-Frumpy) on guitar, Klaus Briest (‘Xhol’) and Hans Hartmann on bass, Willi Pape (‘Thirsty Moon’) on sax and flute, Olaf Cassalich (‘Ougenweide’) on percussion and Carsten Bohn on drums & percussion. The music itself was based on collective improvisation, with either a rockier edge or a jazzier feeling, depending on the musicians, recalling ‘Thirsty Moon’ or ‘Tommorrow’s Gift’… The record is highly recommended…”

The Viola Crayola – Music Breathing of Statues (1974)

Music Breathing of Statues (1974)

“You know, there are great guitar trio albums and then there’s San Antonio’s Viola Crayola. This jazzy psych freakout jam album is just remarkable and sounds about 15 years ahead of its time in technique. And fortunately it IS of its era sound-wise. This thing just rips and shreds and wah-wah’s until you collapse from exhaustion. The last 2 minute goofball track allows us to see Viola’s mentor – Mr. Zappa. If these guys released this in 1991, there would be a monthly feature in Guitar Player for him. Unfortunately, Tony Viola died tragically later in 1974. Album is only about 29 minutes long. A bootleg exists.”

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