Category: noise rock

Melting Hand – High Collider (2016)

“A psych dirge supergroup 4 piece from Newcastle, London and France. Black hole feed-backer twin lead guitar freakouts from Russell Smith (ex skullflower and current member of Terminal Cheesecake) and Mike Vest (current member of BONG, Blown Out, 11Paranoias). Suspended in the heavy cosmos by sonic basslines from Gordon Smith (Current member of Terminal Cheesecake and Luminous Bodies) with total concussion tempo from Tom Fug (Gum Takes Tooth).”

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Fire! With Oren Ambarchi – In The Mouth A Hand (2012)

“The thing with Fire! is that, yes, they’re masters of squealing, Brцtzmann-esque blow-outs, but, above all, they’re fun. Their music is frenetic, but filled with boundless enthusiasm, the trio feeding off one another with obvious, exuberant, glee… Werliin releasing his pent-up energy in a torrent of cymbals and Gustafsson’s notes turning into anguished squeals, the Australian barges his way into the limelight with a molten cascade of feedback, Sonic Youth-style, grappling with his bandmates for space before locking into a krautrock groove with Berthling and Werliin, driving over the horizon of Fire!’s free jazz roots with metronomic precision and the kind of noisy funkiness that defined the best early-seventies German bands such as Neu! and Can.”

Laddio Bolocko – The Life & Times Of Laddio Bolocko (2002)

“It was very intuitive. A lot of it came just out of jamming. Purely improvised jamming. We were starting to realize, listening back to the improvisations, that they were a lot more fun and a lot more interesting to listen to when we found an idea, hung onto it and played it out… We had developed our own compositional/improvisational language together. I think that was one of the real special things about the band, it came from very organic origins because it was really just spawned from playing… from listening to each other and having that intuitiveness.”

Skullflower

“Led by guitarist Matthew Bower, the highly prolific Skullflower boasted the largest cult following of the bunch, with a sound based on sludgy, Black Sabbath-style riffs overlaid with feedback, fuzzed-out guitar noise, and throttling rhythms, all played at an ungodly volume. Always an improvisational outfit, their textured noise freak-outs grew increasingly free-form over the course of their career, moving farther and farther away from even loose definitions of “rock.” Skullflower claimed a broad range of influences in addition to the aforementioned Sabbath: heavy psychedelia (Blue Cheer, et al.), Krautrock, classical avant-gardists (John Cage, Steve Reich, Terry Riley), early industrial music (Throbbing Gristle, Einstürzende Neubauten, Whitehouse), and noise rockers from the American indie world (Sonic Youth, Big Black, the Butthole Surfers).”

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