Category: 1974

The Viola Crayola – Music: Breathing Of Statues (1974)

“You know, there are great guitar trio albums and then there’s San Antonio’s Viola Crayola. This jazzy psych freakout jam album is just remarkable and sounds about 15 years ahead of its time in technique. And fortunately it IS of its era sound-wise. This thing just rips and shreds and wah-wah’s until you collapse from exhaustion. The last 2 minute goofball track allows us to see Viola’s mentor – Mr. Zappa. If these guys released this in 1991, there would be a monthly feature in Guitar Player for him. Unfortunately, Tony Viola died tragically later in 1974. Album is only about 29 minutes long. A bootleg exists.”

Yatha Sidhra – A Meditation Mass (1974)

“The first intention was to create a dreamy musical landscape where the Moog synth, the flute & traditional “percussive” instruments play an important part. Seen as a concept album, “A Meditation Mass” is almost exclusively instrumental. A long suite divided in two themes with two variations for each one. A beautiful and ecstatic musical journey. Their sound oscillates between “pastoral” folk music, spacey rock with the addition of discreet jazzy accents.”

Tommy Bolin – Live At Ebbets Field (1974)

“Bolin is know by way too few guitarists and rock fans out there. His playing is simply put, phenomenally versatile and flat-out fun. It seems Bolin never took himself too seriously, easily throwing down the blues, rocking out with the best Hendrixian riffs of his day, and even playing Gomez-styled jazz rock fusion… This recording catches Bolin doing it all, having a blast, and laying down the jams he loved, in the raw, full of Bolin energy and his crazy way with an axe. Bolin’s Echoplex effect screamin’ into an infinity of feedback-looped, echoes before suddenly collapsing upon themselves into abrupt silence is strangely apropos.”

Birth Control – Live (1974)

“Birth Control’s straightforward progressive rock sound is perfectly demonstrated on Birth Control Live, recorded in June 1974… The best example of their early-’70s sound can be found on the 15 minutes of “Back from Hell” and on the even longer “Gamma Ray” combining an entertaining mix of improvised guitar and keyboard interplay that wonderfully stretches itself out.”

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